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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
harrigan. since mohamed morsi, the president there assumed near absolute powers through a constitutional move. he and the muslim brotherhood have been doing things that have a lot of people concerned in terms of ramming through a very controversial new constitution that the people have been very unhappy about. what's going on there. come back home now for a moment and take a look at the latest numbers we have got on the u.s. economy. the weekly unemployment numbers came in as they do every thursday. the labor department reported 370,000 americans filed for first-time unemployment claims. either way, either way, folks, your taxes will go up despite the haggling going on on capitol hill. you will be paying more to the u.s. government. stuart varney joins me now. so, stuart, that's the bottom line. this is what people i think across the country are starting to realize no matter what they negotiate, 2013 will be different for most of us. >> this is the untold tax story. everybody has been concentrating on tax the rich, yes or no. but the payroll tax holiday goes away january 1. neither polit
: and to egypt. within the last 24 hours the country has seen the worst violence since president mohamed morsi was elected in june. seven people were killed and more than 600 hurt during overnight clashes in cairo outside the presidential palace. we have a report from jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: last year, they ousted a dictator. last night, they turned against one another. religious and secular egyptians fighting outside the palace of their first freely-elected president. after riot police gave up keeping the two warring sides apart. seven people were killed and hundreds were injured. both sides were armed with clubs, but eyewitnesses said the first gunfire came from president morsi's supporters. the president's opponents let off fireworks. but they say they won't back down until the president gives up sweeping new powers or resigns. this morning, the army moved in. not to mount a military coup, but to defend a president they would once have jailed for his political views. the commander of these troops said these tanks were just to keep rival factions apart.
where there are new developments in the power struggle that started with p mohamed morsi's grab for new powers. we're there with details. ayman, we got word there were some considerations there to issue a new koconstitutional declaration of some sort. what can you tell us about all this? >> reporter: sure. it's important to set what triggered these protests two weeks ago, a constitutional declaration by president morsi that was seen as a power grab, gave him sweeping powers through the transitional period. it triggered protests. one of the central demands of the protesters and the opposition to the president has been that he rescind that dec e decree. for the past several days the p president has been trying to figure out a way to kind of minimize the scope of that decree. i has not worked. it has not pleased the opposition. today he met with some of the opposition forces, and what we're learning from egyptian state television, an official government news source, is that the prime minister has suggested that the president is considering a new constitutional declaration and perhaps in l
with president mohammed morsi with assuming dictatorial powers and ramming through a constitution that many fear will turn egypt into an islamic state. david shanker is the director of the program on arab politics at the washington institute for mere east policy and the former middle east adviser to secretary of defense donald rumsfeld. thank you so much for joining us. >> my pleasure. heather: you were there just prior to morsi's power grab. what was the mood then and did you see this coming? >> i think the brotherhood was very confident and morsi took the opportunity of course after the hamas negotiations of doing this. and i think he thought that he had it in the bag. the people were -- the liberals, the so-called liberals i think were upset, but there was no sign that they were going to actually unify and this really pushed it over the edge. heather: so they have banded together. what about the role of the military, in terms of morsi? the military backed the previous president hosni mubarak. on thursday they intervened for the first time in these latest clashes. what is their role with morsi
on his own people. mohammed jamjoom joins us with that part of the story. >> reporter: state officials have said they believe syrians are loading chemical weapons, precursors for sarin, a deadly nerve gas on to aerial bomb that is could be dropped on the syrian people. monday cnn reported that u.s. officials believed that the syrians had begun mixing chemicals that could be used to weaponize sarin, but there were no signs that the syrian regime was going to do anything with those weapons. they maintain yet again today that they have no intention of using chemical weapons in syria. carol? >> mohammed jamjoom in beirut this morning. >>> sad ending for a month-long search of two missing cousins. the bodies of 8-year-old elizabeth collins and 10-year-old lyric cook were found by hunters in the wooded area. the two girls have been missing since july. jim spellman has been following the story since lyric and elizabeth went missing. you know, i know the families were hopeful till the end. what a saddened. >> yeah, indeed. we haven't gotten official word from police that the two podiatries fou
in cairo overnight. the white house says president obama praised the egyptian president mohammed morsi for offering to meet with his opponents this weekend but said that dialogue should come without any preconditions. one opposition group is already turning down that offer. here is how it is going over in cairo. [chanting] shch shep protest hers back on the street this overnight. military sealed off the presidential palace with tanks and bausched wire after the worst violence since president morsi took office in june. [explosions] 700 dead and 600 hurt after battled outside the very presidential palace. police say the two sides threw rocks and fire bombs at each other. the protesters say they are outraged that the president in essence put himself above the law last month. president morsi helped negotiate the cease-fire between israel and hamas he is in charge of enforcing that agreement. tonight he went on egyptian television to call for calm in his own country. david lee miller in our middle east bureau now, david lee? >> shepard, as you mentioned, although one opposition group wasted
and people say mohammed morrissey is this not an 80 character and no one takes them seriously. holding the real range power is the army, the guy in charge of the going on. then, the rest of the chiefs of staff, but were still extensively wandering away versus democratic mullally and future from our friends in the brotherhood. you have to just love it. when your eternal as life gives you phuket site to one of the 21st and 22nd of november. you have this incredible story in "the new york times" about how barack obama has established this confidence, trust. mohamed morsi has been minded to engineer the pragmatism the pragmatism in the next day he assumes dictatorial powers by declaring the timing was delicious. the point is this is the way the muslim brotherhood operates and anyone who understands that the brotherhood is out, cleanup adjustment taking could've seen this coming a long, long time ago. the conundrum is this, this is the essence of the problem. if you want to have a democratic process in the middle east, one that represents most of the people, you have to have islamist partie
between unions and management. martha: egyptian protesters keeping up the pressure on president mohammed morsi. the latest in the clashes in tahrir square. the next hour of "america's newsroom" is coming up. don't go away. [ male announcer ] when was the last time something made your jaw drop? campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain the equity in your home, or
to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally. and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like a, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern, whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he did a power grab. there's now pushback. i think it's wrong to assume, though, that all the people pushing back are necessarily democrats. >> no. >> a lot of people are just going to try to take advantage. >> but everybody's pushing back, and certainly elements of mubarak's regime are looking for an opportunity to regain some power. but you also have coptic christian pushing back, other islamists pushing back, some even more extreme. >> exactly. >> you have all elements pushing back here. i'm absolutely bewildered as to why morsi thought he could get away with this. >> these are guys, morsi, who are either in jail o
waiting for president mohammed morsi to speak. this is after a night of violent clashes that killed six people and killed more than 670 injured. tanks, armored personnel carriers clearing the area, scattering clouds of 0 protesters fighting in the streets. the latest spiral of violence after morsi's sweeping power grab. supporters of the muslim brotherhood who back president morsi clashing with opponents saying he made himself a dictator. reza sayah in cairo, the president not spoken. when he does, what might he say? >> reporter: well, nobody really knows what he's going to say other than members of his inner circle, but certainly, there's a lot of pressure on president morsi to calm down this conflict that's been escalating over a few days, especially the last night. we've eagerly waiting for him to speak, but he hasn't spoken yet. we're not quite sure what the delay is. initially, word was that at 6:00 p.m. local time, three and a half hours ago, he was going to deliver his speech and then reports came that this was going to be a taped speech. taped the address. dlifed it to state med
. mohammed, give us a sense. this is a pretty big fish for somebody to be leaving,nd i imagine he has valuable information as well being somebody part of the military police. >> reporter: that's right, suzanne. he identifies himself as a major general, that he's the chief of military police in syria. we spoke earlier with rebel free syrian army spokespeople. they said this was the man he claimed to be. the free syrian army helped to shuttle him to safety. it was a very difficult journey getting him from inside syria into neighboring turkey. it took far longer than they thought it would, and they were willing to help. other military officials wanted to defect for a certain amount of time longer. yes, as you said, if this turns out to be true and this man is as high-ranking as he said he is, this is a big blow to the regime. there's more and more high level defections the last several months. the fact more and more are coming seems to suggest he's losing more of a grip of power in syria. this is he not what they want out there when you have the u.n. and arab league enjoy trying to negot
them. gregg: and to egypt now. president mohamed morsi is reportedly putting a second decree forth. he's putting his newly-approved constitution into effect. voters approving the islamist-backed constitutions by what an election official calls a nearly two to one margin. protesters have broken out over the constitution since it was passed by the islamist-controlled legislature. opposition members say it does not protect the rights of egyptians for the rest of the year which ousted former form e president hosni mubarak. patti ann: well, a top syrian general has reportedly switched sides to join the opposition. the military police leader made the announcement in a video. dozens of officers have defected since the crisis evolved last march, but this is one of the most senior. could it be a turning point? joining us now, navy captain chuck nash. thanks for being with us. how significant is this defection? >> well, i think it just shows that the tower's crumbling around assad, and it's certainly not good for him, and it's going to make those who are supporting him question his staying power
. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding that democracy is not just a way of voting but a way of thinking. pant of that way of thinking is that you've got to protect minorities. you've got to -- democracy doesn't function unless it is accompanied by an open mind. and so you can understand there is a lot of anxiety in egypt about the constitutional changes proposed. and even as the international community obviously applauded egypt's efforts in bringing about t
is here. she's picking up that part of the story. >> embattled president mohammed morsi went on nationwide tv. he addressed the protests. he seemed to inflamed their outrage. within minutes, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in cairo was up in flames. reza joins us on the phone from cairo. we want to talk about president morsi in a second. first, you just arrived at the scene of the fire at the muslim brotherhood headquarters. what are you seeing, and what are you learning about who's responsible for this? >> reporter: let's verify what happened. two hours ago, they reported the main headquarters here in cairo was attacked by protesters and torched. we raced over here. we're in front of the headquarters right now. there's no indication of a fire here, but certainly there's a large group of what appear to be opponents of president morsi and the muslim brotherhood. they're trying to do everything they can to get to this building, and they're being blocked by police. so we have yet another standoff. if anyone thought president morsi's speech would pacify these people and calm them down, thi
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)